While growing up I have always been fascinated by the weather and I have always wanted to learn the dynamics or the reasons why weather forms in the first place. And I did learn all of that.

Tornadoes form because of different air masses, cold weather is in the winter months, and why hurricanes are usually only when warm air is in the atmosphere.

Yes, I learned all of that and I can explain all of it to you. A meteorologist always wants to know the “why’s or the how’s” in weather, which is why scientists are always doing research.

And there’s nothing wrong with that. We do need to know more about Earth and how it’s changing. But there’s one thing that some meteorologists fail to realize.

Meteorologists help save lives.

You probably just read the sentence and now you’re thinking how? They don’t call 911 or do CPR. No, meteorologists don’t do that, but we do alert you in case of severe weather.

If a tornado is on the way we tell you to go to a safe location and head towards the lowest part of your home or to a room where there are no windows.

If meteorologists didn’t tell you that, it’s guaranteed that many more deaths would occur if there was no warning.

We might not directly save lives, but we do indirectly.

Another example is a hurricane. If a meteorologist is forecasting for a landfall of a hurricane you are warned to told to head to higher ground and away from the coastline. If you stay then that is your decision.

I am a meteorologist and I know for a fact that I have helped save people’s lives. Just a few weeks ago, I was on Facebook Live with over 1,000 people watching and many of the comments scrolling past the screen said “we are huddled in the bathtub trying to get away from the storm.”

When I read those words it meant that people were listening to the experts and were taking the severe storms seriously.

And I’m glad to report that this was the right thing to do because on that night of the Facebook Live there were 3 reported tornadoes and one was rated an EF2. Many homes were destroyed and no injuries were reported.

And I can guarantee you that if there was no warning for these storms then there would have been more deaths. Luckily, there wasn’t.

After the severe weather event was over I was glad that I know I did my job because I forecasted a severe weather event, it happened, and people listened.

It isn’t just about saying words and giving a forecast… it is about people’s lives and your goal is to help out the community.

I went to the tornado scene in Laurel, Delaware about 1 week after the EF 2 tornado and I physically saw the destruction from my very own eyes.

I’m usually in the studio report on the weather, but it is a different point of view when you go to the areas affected yourself and you get to see the impact you made to others.

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